Productivity Parade

Another busy weekend. Bob and I rode on Saturday (a mere 8.9 miles, as I was pressed for time), then Laura and I went to the Schoonovers’ annual “Sometime ‘Round Labor Day” Picnic and stuffed all manner of grilled food into our faces. She’s eating for two now. I’ve been eating for two since 1995.

On Sunday we bought a couple of new bookshelves so I’d have a place to put all of my books in the office downstairs. We spent most of the day sorting through and moving mountains of stuff from one office to the other. I also wound up mucking with the innards of Laura’s computer early, early Monday morning in order to give her a better modem and a working floppy drive. I don’t think I was at all successful in the latter effort, but wound up mangling my thumb in the attempt.

Yesterday we bought another bookshelf, this one to replace the bulky entertainment center “bookshelf” in the upstairs office. Laura spent most of the day organizing the metric ton of papers and such in her new office, and managed to make it look more like an office and less like a document storage closet. In the evening, I mowed the lawn, took out the trash and then inexplicably found myself watching the tail end of GSN‘s The Amazing Race marathon.

Still to do:

  • Buy and install some wall-mounted shelves in both offices for additional books and (in my case) toys.
  • Move the cedar chest from the guest bedroom to Laura’s office to make room for a crib. A crib. The kind in which a baby sleeps.
  • Get a damn haircut. Seriously, I’m way overdue.

8 thoughts on “Productivity Parade”

  1. Ah yes, the crib. Babies don’t just SLEEP there, ya know. 80% of what babies ‘do’ happens in the crib (poop, pee, sleep, cry – that leaves eating to be done, ah, elsewhere). You will be summoned there often in the coming months, probably at the MOST inconvenient hour, to SHARE in 80% of what your baby will do! (Depending on the feeding method, you may want to get in on the other 20% of what the kid does, too)

    Speaking of ‘do’ … Get a haircut, ya hairy goober!

  2. (Depending on the feeding method, you may want to get in on the other 20% of what the kid does, too)

    I’ve gotta tell you, I’m not quite sure how to take that one.

  3. Watch your involvement in the 20% carefully. One advantage of fatherhood is the general incompatibility with feeding, esp in the beginning.

    It becomes much easier to enjoy those “special moments” as the child gets older and starts to get more than a couple hours of sleep at a time.

    Mothers are hard-wired to hover over the child for the first few months.

    Let them.

    Lest you think I’m totally uncaring, fatherhood is the most rewarding and challenging task you will ever undertake. I wouldn’t miss out for anything.

  4. “Lest you think I’m totally uncaring, fatherhood is the most rewarding and challenging task you will ever undertake. I wouldn’t miss out for anything.”

    Nice save there, Thagg…

  5. As I understand it, children go through three distinct phases of development:

    Crying, eating, pooping. (0 – 6 months)
    Crawling, grabbing, crying, eating, pooping. (6 – 12 months)
    Mowing lawn, washing cars, cleaning gutters, crying, eating, pooping. (12 – 216 months)

    My involvement as a father will be most significant in the third phase.

  6. As it should be.

    Nothin’ against involvement in phase I and II. Lets you begin to ‘bond’ and gives Lola a break.

    But your time is indeed in phase III.

    As I understand it, especially if it is a girl.

    “Nice save there, Thagg…”

    Ah, well. Wouldn’t want to appear too primitive, eh? (Drags knuckles on floor on way to ‘fridge for another adult beverage)

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