TVstuff: Return of Fall Season 2007

It’s been a couple of weeks and I have (in theory) had a chance to watch many of the shows I was looking forward to in early September.

Doctor Who. I think the season may have wrapped up, but I could be wrong. There are a couple of episodes waiting for me on the TiVo but I haven’t gotten around to watching them yet.

Who Wants to Be a Superhero? Hoo, boy. Five episodes on the TiVo and watching them is feeling more and more like a chore, so I think I’m just going to delete them and move on. The first episode of the second season was way too much like the latter half of the first season for me, so I’m inclined to ditch this turkey.

Eureka continues to be the best show on SciFi. Excellent premise, awesome cast, decent special effects and consistently entertaining scientific blunders make it an enjoyable experience all around.

Torchwood. Yeah. I watched the first episode and it totally failed to grab me, so I didn’t even bother setting up a season pass. Sorry, John Wheelbarrow fans, I’m not joining your ranks anytime soon.

iCarly. I haven’t watched any more of this show. Really.

Journeyman started off with an excellent premiere; maybe a bit slow right at the beginning, but sticking through the entire episode was well worth it. There was a very nice twist in the last third of the show that goes a long way to distancing Journeyman from Quantum Leap, a comparison that everyone (including me) was making in advance of the premiere.

Bionic Woman wasn’t too bad. I’m still a little worried about whether Michelle Ryan has enough presence to carry the show and the first fight sequence felt a bit herky-jerky to me—not to mention way off balance; Sarah (Katee Sackhoff) should have handily kicked Jamie’s (Michelle Ryan) ass up and down those rooftops—but I’ll stick with it a couple more episodes to see what happens.

Moonlight. I haven’t watched the premiere yet, and as of last night there should be a second episode waiting for me. More to come.

Reaper was pretty good. The interplay between Sam (Andrew Airlie) and Sock (Tyler Labine) is a little too Kevin Smith for my taste (it felt an awful lot like Dante and Randall in Clerks) but I did enjoy Ray Wise as the devil and there was a nice Ghostbusters flavor to the final battle with the arsonist whose soul had escaped from Hell.

Heroes. I should really watch this; I don’t know why I’ve been putting it off.

21 thoughts on “TVstuff: Return of Fall Season 2007”

  1. No Chuck or Pushing Daisies?? For shame!!

    I’ll see if I can find the first couple episodes of both shows this weekend. If I deem them worthy, I’ll add Season Passes.

  2. Also, the heroine of Torchwood is totally teh hawt!!!

    Is she? I really didn’t notice; I was kind of uninterested by the halfway point of the premiere.

  3. I would have to agree with Slowhand on this……Chuck is very good. Big Band Theory is good too…..

    When I saw that Johnny Galecki is in Big Bang Theory, I thought it might be worth watching. Alas, I didn’t remember to set up the TiVo.

  4. This is a show by the same person that does Two and a Half Men and used to do Dharma and Greg. I can’t remember his name off hand, but I know one thing he is know for is at the end of each of his shows he puts up an episode card that is usually VERY funny.

  5. Or you could just stop watching all these shows (complete garbage) and watch the best-written show on television right now: How I Met Your Mother. Sorry folks, I know good television writing when I see it and none of these shows (including the godawful Heroes) even comes remotely close. Even better, you could stop watching television entirely and read Bleak House by Charles Dickens. Television can’t hold a candle to Dickens. Five years from now, you’ll remember reading Bleak House but you won’t remember a single thing about The Bionic Woman other than it sucked. Then again, folks thought The Sopranos was good, which just goes to show you how easy it is to fool people. Exhibit B? Friends. Does anybody want to admit to liking that now? I thought not. Oh, and How I Met Your Mother is even more cleverly written than The Office. Chuck? Don’t make me laugh. That show will be lucky to see a full second season. This new crop of shows should be plowed under and forgotten as quickly as possible. Family Guy cannot be compared to any show, ever. It is in a class of its own. The couch-handling scene in the Star Wars episode may be the funniest thing written for television ever: OK, OK, put it down for a second. Let’s think about this. We’re making this harder than it has to be. (Anybody who has ever moved a couch knows why this is so damned funny.)

  6. Wow. Some strong opinions there, Rob, and I’m going to have to respectfully disagree with you on many of them.

    I thoroughly enjoyed the first season of Heroes and, unlike a lot of people, felt the second season premiere was quite satisfying. Granted, I haven’t watched the second or third episodes yet, but I will son.

    I can’t comment on Chuck, but you’re the first person I’ve heard say anything bad about it. Ditto for The Sopranos, actually.

    Family Guy‘s Star Wars episode wasn’t as funny as Robot Chickens‘s, and though I’ve moved couches on more than one occasion, I’ll have to again disagree with you on the relative funniness of the whole couch-moving bit. It was amusing (the second time I saw it; the first, less so), but didn’t come anywhere near making me laugh out loud, unlike “Ladies and gentlemen, John Williams and the London Philharmonic Orchestra!” and “Fine, stay here and rot, you stuck up bitch.”

    I was never a fan of Friend, even when it was popular; I can probably count the number of episodes I’ve seen without taking off my socks.

    I’ve seen one episode of How I Met Your Mother and I’m afraid it really didn’t do anything for me. I’m not saying it isn’t worth watching; just that the episode I watched didn’t convince me that I needed to see more.

    Oh, and as for Charles Dickens, I’ll paraphrase Peter Griffin: I have read his work and I am not a fan. I was force-fed Great Expectations in high school, and if there’s one sure-fire way to turn people off classic literature, it’s to cram it down their throats in the 9th grade.

    If enjoying Heroes and not Dickens puts me into the ranks of people who are apparently being “fooled” by bad television that is somehow cleverly disguising itself as anything but, so be it. I can live with that.

  7. Well, of course you can live with it, you don’t know any better. Ha ha. Just kidding, I like to rankle people. If rankling were an occupation, I might have made something of myself.

    The funny thing about TV is there’s absolutely no way of convincing people that what YOU’RE watching is great and that what THEY’RE watching is crap. It never stops anybody from trying, though.

    I do urge you to try Dickens again. I don’t care what you watch but I do like to try to influence what people read from time to time. I have found that when most folks read again what they were forced to read in high school, they enjoy it more since they’ve learned a little something about life since those carefree years. Dickens is definitely an acquired taste with a very unique writing style but I assure you that the story of Bleak House is quite fascinating once you get into the characters. It’s a bit like Hemingway: once you get used to the style, the story is more fun to read.

    The Sopranos was probably the most overrated piece of TV garbage ever written. You won’t find many people saying this because most people are idiots. Everything that happened in The Sopranos was already covered in the first two Godfather movies. Nothing new there.

    Wait until the next time you move a couch. I’ll bet it’s been a long time since you had to move one. It’s clear that you and I have very different takes on what is funny and it is also clear that you are wrong. Again, just trying to spice up kjtoo, don’t take it personally, even though you really are wrong. See? There I go again. Damn.

    I don’t know when to stop, do I? Actually, I do. Is it time to stop yet? Nope. Not yet. OK, my little boy just carried my shoes into the room. It must be time to stop.

  8. I’ve revisited a couple of the books that were required reading in high school, including The Catcher in the Rye, The Grapes of Wrath and 1984. The first two were way back when The Ravenhill Book Club was in full swing, but I’ve read 1984 twice in the last fifteen years and no book club can take credit for that.

    That said, I’m not re-reading Great Expectations anytime soon, except at gunpoint. I may give Dickens another shot, but my reading list is far too long to say it’ll be in the foreseeable future.

  9. 1984: Great stuff. Perhaps the best opening sentence for a novel ever written. Can’t say I’m a big fan of Catcher in the Rye of The Grapes of Wrath. Not bad, but they never did it for me. To each his own. If you haven’t re-read Huckleberry Finn, that one is definitely worth reading any number of times. There’s a passage near the end when Huck and Tom decide to capture some snakes to make Jim’s imprisonment even more insufferable but the snakes get loose in the house. It’s one of the funniest things I’ve read in some time.

    Bleak House. Trust me. Worth it. You’ll see.

    Actually, you won’t see. But you SHOULD see. Then, you’d know how right I am. You might think it would be a lot of work being this right. It’s just my little cross to bear.

    As long as I wasn’t asked: I think you should have chosen a bigger font for your redesign. You don’t want to get me started on the topics of redesigns. It’s what sites (AG does it all the time) do when they’ve got nothing better to do. There, you did it, you got me started. Who knows where it will end?

  10. Ah, but you were asked about the redesign, at least to the degree that I solicited feedback.

    And see what happened just now? You may need to do a refresh (Ctrl-F5 is my preferred method), but hopefully you’ve noticed that the font size in the posts and the comments has been bumped from 12 to 15 pixels, and the line height bumped from 18 to 21 pixels. I also bumped the comment author name up a bit to help make it stand out more.

    That’s as near to instant results as you’re likely to see.

    Additional comments are welcome, as the redesign is ongoing.

    As for Huckleberry Finn, alas, it is one of those books that was not force-fed to me in high school, and I’m rather embarrassed to admit that I’ve never read it.

    Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle, yes. Huckleberry Finn, no.

  11. Now THAT is customer service. Love the slightly bigger font!

    Hard to believe they didn’t force-feed Huckleberry Finn to you. What were they teaching up there in Michigan? I thought you couldn’t graduate high school without reading Huckleberry Finn. Well, all kidding aside, it’s a pretty good read.

    Looking to be a banner night here . . . boy is running a mild temperature because we’ve got two teeth ready to make their appearance in the world and wife just came in, went to the bedroom and went to sleep after informing me that she had to pull over on her drive home to puke. I think I’ll sleep on the couch tonight just to be safe. Aieee.

    Not exactly information you needed to know but there you have it. Let me know when we’ve set the record for most pointless, lengthy set of comments for kjtoo. There’s no shortage of random subjects I could discuss and I’m sure that’s what your loyal readers would enjoy most: random irritating comments from somebody they don’t know from Adam (see: we could discuss/research the etymology of the phrase “don’t know from Adam” and see what that’s all about).

  12. “Even better, you could stop watching television entirely and read Bleak House by Charles Dickens. Television can’t hold a candle to Dickens.”

    Or I could do both. Although I think I’d had enough Dickens to last my lifetime by my 2d year of college.

    “Oh, and as for Charles Dickens, I’ll paraphrase Peter Griffin: I have read his work and I am not a fan. I was force-fed Great Expectations in high school, and if there’s one sure-fire way to turn people off classic literature, it’s to cram it down their throats in the 9th grade.”

    It could have been worse. You might have been forcefed Theodore Drieser. The tragedy in ‘An American Tragedy’ is how it can destroy a love of literature for life.

  13. One show you should check out is Life. I like shows that have both an episodic storyline and an overarching storyline (a la X-Files). I’ve always liked Damian Lewis, too. I fear this show will be this season’s Raines, however.

    I like Chuck and Reaper. Right now the only thing worth watching in Bionic Woman is Katie Sackhoff, but it will remain a guilty pleasure until it is canceled.

    I’ve enjoyed Journeyman and Heroes. Pushing Daisies may be the best new show, but the fairytale quality that makes it so special may doom it to a single season.

  14. I’m loving the feedback on this post.

    P.G.: I’ve heard good things about Life, and I’m surprisd because it wasn’t on my radar at all. In fact, I’d never heard of it until someone at work was extolling its virtues.

    Slowhand: Am I a philistine if this is the first I’m hearing of Theodore Drieser?

    Rob: Here’s a list of everything I can remember reading for school from about the 6th grade on:

    1. The Red Badge of Courage
    2. Where the Red Fern Grows
    3. Great Expectations
    4. The Jungle
    5. Lord of the Flies
    6. Les Miserables
    7. 1984
    8. The Grapes of Wrath
    9. A Separate Peace
    10. The Catcher in the Rye

    I think we read part of Tom Sawyer, but not all of it. I was also miffed that we stopped reading Les Miserable about two-thirds of the way through it; that was one of the few books we had to read that I was enjoying.

  15. I second the nomination for Life. It stars the guy who played the lead in Band of Brothers, although I forget his name.

    Theodore Drieser has slowly fallen out of favor. Its possible you eluded him in school, and if so, you should give thanks to Cthulu.

    But while I’m not necessarily suprised you’ve never had to read it, I am somewhat surprised you’ve never heard of ‘An American Tragedy’.

    They never made you read Heart of Darkness either?

    No Shakespeare?

    I’d ask for my money back.

  16. Slowhand: We read Shakespeare (Hamlet), but I didn’t count it because it’s a play, not a book.

    I’ve not read Heart of Darkness, but I have it at home.

  17. That’s a pretty interesting list, Kris. Schools do make kids read some interesting things. I look at your list and think to myself: do those teachers really think high school kids will understand this stuff? They may get the basic idea but appreciating the quality of the writing and the plotting and things like that are not the province of your typical teenager.

    Heart of Darkness is worth a read. It’s astonishing to discover that English was not Conrad’s first language, given that he writes so well in it. (At least, I’m pretty sure he wrote in English and it wasn’t translated.)

    Guess what I’m reading right now? You got it: Great Expectations. I’ll let you know how it goes. OK, I’m off to take care of the invalid wife and child. It’s one of those situations where I take care of them and wonder how long it will be until I get sick. Oh, I already emailed you but the folks reading these comments could stand to know: Happy Anniversary to the Johnsons!

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