Gamestuff: Enter Ye Olde Fartz

Not too long ago, I rebuilt my PC, swapping out the old Intel 850GB motherboard and 1.7 GHz Pentium 4 processor for an ECS Elitegroup GF7100PVT-M3 motherboard and a dual-core Pentium E2180 2 GHz CPU. I also bumped my RAM up from 1 GB to 3 GB ((The onboard NVIDIA GeForce 7100 GPU commandeers 256MB of RAM, leaving the system with 2.75GB.)) and traded my tired, old Maxtor EIDE hard drives for a 500 GB Western Digital SATA drive. I eschewed the motherboard’s built-in audio in favor of  my Sound Blaster Audigy because I’d been using Firewire to synchronize my iPod and didn’t feel like digging around for the USB cable.

Thusly upgraded, I then proceeded to install a slew of games that ran just (or at least mostly) fine on the old PC.

  • Command & Conquer: Generals
  • Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind
  • Freedom Force
  • Homeworld
  • Unreal Tournament 2004
  • WarCraft III: Reign of Chaos

WarCraft III: Reign of Chaos (PC)When Sam Chupp got wind via Twitter that I’d installed WarCraft III, he suggested that we play online sometime. We played a game in which we joined forces against what we could only assume were two twelve-year-old boys and were soundly trounced.

The following week, we opted to stay away from the hordes of clearly superior yet entirely anonymous players and set up a private game. Thus were the seeds of Ye Olde Fartz sown. Soon we were joined by Jay “Kingfish” Lynn,  Gus (AKA The Bearded Goose) and (when he wasn’t too busy getting paid to play games on his Xbox 360) Ken Newquist. The WarCraft III game became a weekly event, a three- or four-player free-for-all battle between Orcs, Humans, Night Elves and the gruesome Undead.

After a few weeks of real-time strategy, ((Wherein I kicked some serious ass, most nights.)) Sam suggested that we try another favorite game of mine, Neverwinter Nights. And so, this past Thursday—after about an hour and a half of patches, critical fixes and reinstalls—Ye Olde Fartz began a cooperative roleplaying adventure. We’re playing what the kids on the Intertubes call the “OC”, or “Original Campaign”, but I know that Sam has something up his sleeve he’d like to try, so after we’ve cured the mysterious plague that is…uh…plaguing…the city of Neverwinter, we’ll move on to Sam’s home-brewed module. As Sam has significant game design experience, I have no doubt that the story he cooks up will be both memorable and fun to play. ((No pressure, Sam.))

Now if I can just convince them all to play Crimson Skies